PROGRAM

IEEE IFETC 2024 detailed technical program will be published soon. Please note that the schedule may change, so be sure to reference this page for the latest version of the program.

PRELIMINARY PROGRAM

11:00 am TUTORIALS

11:00 am Tutorial 1

12:30 pm Tutorial 2

02:00 pm Tutorial 3

03:30 pm Tutorial 4

08:30 am PLENARY SESSION

09:30 am Coffee break

09:45 am MORNING SESSIONS

12:00 pm Lunch

01:30 pm AU PLENARY SESSION

02:30 pm AFTERNOON SESSIONS

04:45 pm Coffee break

05:00 pm KEYNOTES

06:00 pm WELCOME & POSTER SESSION

08:30 am PLENARY SESSION

09:30 am Coffee break

09:45 am MORNING SESSIONS

12:00 pm Lunch

01:30 pm PLENARY SESSION

02:30 pm AFTERNOON SESSIONS

04:45 pm Coffee break

05:00 pm KEYNOTES

06:00 pm DINNER

08:30 am PLENARY SESSION

09:30 am Coffee break

09:45 am MORNING SESSIONS

12:00 pm Lunch

01:30 pm PT PLENARY SESSION

02:30 pm AFTERNOON SESSIONS

04:45 pm Coffee break

05:00 pm KEYNOTES

06:00 pm CLOSING

SPEAKERS & ABSTRACTS

Ana Claudia Arias
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Ana Claudia Arias

University of California, Berkeley

"Flexible and Integrated Power Sources for Portable Devices"

Printed batteries, along with photovoltaic power systems comprising solar modules, energy storage, and power management electronics, are pivotal for diverse applications ranging from off-grid and portable power to ambient light harvesting for sensor nodes. The co-design and integration of these components using printing and coating methods on flexible substrates enable the creation of efficient and customizable systems.

Photovoltaic module and energy storage technologies suitable for integration into flexible power systems are considered. The design of electrical characteristics needed for efficiently powering desired loads and strategies for physically integrating these components will be discussed. Our analysis encompasses both hybrid and fully flexible photovoltaic systems, emphasizing the critical role of application-specific requirements in determining the materials and architectures of the system components.

Thuc-Quyen Nguyen
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Thuc-Quyen Nguyen

University of California, Santa Barbara (UCSB)

"Organic Photodetectors: Material Design, Device Engineering and Applications"

Wide-range light detection from the visible to the near-infrared (NIR) region is central to many applications such as high-speed digital cameras, autonomous vehicles, and wearable electronics.

Organic photodetectors (OPDs) were shown to be a promising platform for these applications. However, the conventional OPDs are often limited by low responsivity, narrow absorption range, high dark current under applied bias, and large-scale production of these devices require halogenated processing solvents that have negative environmental impacts.

In this talk, I will discuss the molecular design rule especially for green solvent processing and strategies to reduce dark current, enhance external quantum efficiency (EQE), and broaden the photodetection range in near IR organic photodetectors based on a bulk heterojunction comprised of a polymer donor and a non-fullerene acceptor. Using resonant optical microcavity, we can extend the wavelength detection range of OPD to a longer wavelength, achieving EQE > 50 % over a broad spectrum 450–1100 nm with a peak specific detectivity (D*) of 1.1´1013 Jones at l = 1100 nm. By employing a new acceptor IR6, EQE = 35 % and D* = 4.1´1012 Jones are obtained at l = 1150 nm. We also demonstrate the use of OPDs in wearable self-powered devices to monitor heart rate and blood oxygen saturation.

Alberto Salleo
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Alberto Salleo

Stanford University, USA

"Is There a Trade-off Between Efficient Charge Transport and Stretchability in Semiconducting Polymers?"

Carrier mobility in conjugated polymers continues to increase with recent reports of field-effect mobilities exceeding 10 cm2/(V.s), a figure that enables many exciting technologies such as flexible emissive displays, printed radio-frequency tags and stretchable skin-like electronics. From the materials science point of view, conjugated polymers are fascinating as they are neither entirely ordered nor disordered exhibiting regularity at different length-scales. It is often assumed that crystallinity and order are needed for efficient charge transport. However semicrystalline polymers are brittle thus possibly imposing a trade-off between electrical and mechanical properties. In this talk I will show how multimodal structural, optical, and electrical characterization can help elucidate fundamental transport mechanisms and how they relate to the microstructure in order to design materials that are able to eluding this trade-off.

Joachim Burghartz
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Joachim Burghartz

IMS Chips, Germany

"Hybrid Systems-in-Foil: Merging Complementary Technologies"

Large-area flexible electronics has strongly been driven by the paper printing industry, looking for new business opportunities. The advent of organic and metal-oxide semiconductor materials has enabled concepts of printed electronics, aiming at low-cost, large-area, and multifunctional flexible electronic systems in contrast to compact, high-performance, and highly-integrated chip products.

However, more and more applications would be benefitting from combining the advantages of these complementary technology. Hybrid Systems-in-Foil (HySiF) allow for merging the best of those two worlds through assembly of  ultrathin chips large-area printed components jointly on a flexible substrate.

This article addresses the concept with advantages and challenges of HySiFs in terms of their electronic and mechanical aspects. Also addressed are three generic application cases along with manufacturing aspects.

Oana D. Jurchescu
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Oana D. Jurchescu

Wake Forest University in Winston-Salem, North Carolina (USA)

"Shaping the Future of Flexible Optoelectronics and Bioelectronics with Organic Transistors"

Our lives are increasingly intertwined with electronics, from smartphones and smart cars to medical devices and power grids. The Internet of Things (IoT) promises an even more connected future, but it requires new technologies that are flexible, adaptable, and cost-effective. Organic thin-film transistors (OTFTs) are prime candidates for such applications, but unfortunately have not yet reached the performance levels needed for incorporation in real-world devices. Despite significant progress, optimizing charge transport and device stability remains a challenge.

This presentation will focus on the design, processing and device physics in OTFTs, highlighting the current limitations in optimizing charge injection and transport. I will also discuss their environmental and operational stability and highlight the major factors that lead to degradation. Next, I will introduce laser printing, a rapid and scalable manufacturing technique for optoelectronic devices. This method is low-cost, compatible with flexible substrates and environmentally friendly since it is solvent-free, thus eliminating the need of hazardous solvents typically used for printed electronics.

Finally, I will showcase a powerful example of using OTFTs in healthcare. Radiation dosimeters made from large arrays of OTFTs conform to the body and act as flexible, skin-conformal dosimeters. These devices offer high-resolution, real-time dose mapping directly on the patient’s skin, overcoming limitations of current methods.

Max Christian Lemme
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Max Christian Lemme

RWTH Aachen University, Germany

"2D Materials: Enabling High Performance Electronics and Optoelectronics on Flexible Substrates"

Two-dimensional (2D) materials could make a difference for various applications in micro- and optoelectronics, in particular since they show high performance in electronic and optoelectronic devices. The fact that they can be transferred to arbitrary substrates after their wafer-scale deposition and growth makes them suitable for applications beyond classic silicon technology.

In this talk, I will show experiments on photodetectors based on semiconducting molybdenum disulfide (MoS2), including sub-bandgap absorption in the infrared range. In addition, the integration of MoS2 and graphene with flexible amorphous silicon will be discussed.

Semiconducting 2D materials, when used as channel materials in field effect transistors (FETs), can provide suitable performance for both logic and analog electronics. Here, n-type MoS2 and p-type WSe2-FETs will be discussed for respective applications on flexible substrates. Although graphene lacks a bandgap and is therefore not a proper transistor channel material, it can be used as key components in metal-insulator-graphene diodes that show excellent high-frequency performance in different circuit configurations.

In summary, 2D materials may be a game changer for ubiquitous, low-cost, and high-performance flexible electronics.

Catherine Ramsdale
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Catherine Ramsdale

Pragmatic Semiconductor, UK

"How do you balance the competing demands of technological advancement and market-based time pressures to ensure successful development of a scalable technology suitable for high-volume manufacturing?"

Pragmatic is revolutionising semiconductor fabrication. Its unique production process takes FlexICs – flexible integrated circuits – from tape-out to delivery in just four weeks, at a fraction of the cost of silicon semiconductors. It also consumes significantly less water and energy, resulting in a significantly reduced carbon footprint. FlexICs enable connect, sense and compute capabilities to power the Internet of Things and drive digital transformation across sectors including consumer, healthcare and industrial.

In this talk, Dr Catherine Ramsdale, Pragmatic’s SVP Technology, discusses the maturation of Pragmatic’s ground-breaking technology platform from proof-of-concept to manufacture – from ‘lab to fab’ – looking beyond technical feasibility to examine the factors that influence success. She describes how balancing the competing demands of technological advancement and market-based time pressures can ensure the successful development of a scalable technology suitable for high-volume manufacturing.

Pietro Cataldi
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Pietro Cataldi

Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia (IIT), Italy

"Materials for Green Electronics: Challenges, Opportunities and Applications in Robotics and Green Electronics"

Commercially available materials for electronics offer excellent performance at affordable prices. However, these materials primarily consist of long-lasting, petroleum-derived components. Furthermore, their development has been within the framework of a linear economy (produce-use-waste), neglecting considerations of biodegradability, circularity, and end-of-life management. The sustainability of these materials is compromised by issues such as scarcity, human and environmental toxicity, and challenges in recycling. Therefore, it is crucial to prioritize developing materials for electronics that are biobased, biodegradable, and environmentally friendly.

In this tutorial, we will summarize the available sustainable alternatives to traditionally employed materials for electronics. We will briefly survey the employment of biopolymers and proteins as biodegradable, flexible, and lightweight insulators and the unconventional strategies developed to produce environmentally friendly semiconductors. The tutorial’s core will be on green printed circuit board alternatives to flame retardant four (FR4) and electrical conductors, particularly electrically conductive composites. We will summarize the use of green approaches to fabricate electronic materials that can degrade partially or fully in the environment. We will discuss strategies to make compostable FR43 and degradable electronic conductors. Finally, possible applications that will thrive by exploiting environmentally friendly materials for electronics, e.g., in the context of edible electronics or robotics, will be considered.

Guoxiang (Emma) Hu
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Guoxiang (Emma) Hu

Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta (USA)

"Introduction to Computational Approaches for Semiconductors"

Computational studies, complementing experimental observations, can provide deep physicochemical insights into structure-processing-property relationships, and offer new opportunities for semiconductor design and discovery.

In this tutorial, I will introduce basic concepts of ab initio quantum chemistry methods, and demonstrate applications of these methods to semiconducting polymers, perovskites, and transition metal dichalcogenides. I will begin with the widely used density functional theory (DFT) method, which has a good balance between accuracy and computational cost. Then, I will highlight the limitations of DFT, particularly for strongly correlated semiconductors, and discuss how many-body quantum chemistry methods (e.g., quantum Monte Carlo) can be applied to overcome those limitations.

Finally, some data-driven and machine-learning-assisted computational approaches will be covered, which is essential for the design and discovery of highly tunable semiconducting materials. Besides learning computational techniques, the audience will also be encouraged to perform basic calculations during the tutorial, which can be incorporated into their experimental research.

Esma Ismailova
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Esma Ismailova

École Nationale Supérieure Des Mines De Saint Étienne, France

"Seamless organic bioelectronic interfaces: from the fabrication to the health monitoring"

In the 21st century, consumers are rapidly gaining access to a novel suite of wearable electronic devices such as smart watches, glasses and garments. These technologies promise both comfort and ease of use, as well as an access to a wealth of health-related information.

Advances in the field of electronic textiles, and recent achievements in organic electronics, have enabled the development of new flexible and conformable technologies that can perform the same sensing as current solid-state devices, for a fraction of the cost. Such progress relies on the subtle engineering of organic materials to model their properties in functional devices. The sustainable potential of using organic ionic and electronic conducting materials in wearable monitoring systems has yet to be demonstrated. In cutaneous applications, the use of such organic materials as electrodes lowers contact impedance with the skin resulting in higher quality recordings compared to metal-based electrodes. Combining these materials with textile structures and thin films reduces the mechanical mismatch at the interface with the skin, which enables the recording of electrophysiological activities for long time intervals with an enhanced signal to noise ratio. Traditional and non-traditional direct patterning techniques allow the selective deposition of organic materials onto different kind of fabrics.

Therefore, the integration of organic electronics and the textile platform provides low-cost and tailored solutions in interfacing smart devices with the human body.

Hocheon Yoo
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Hocheon Yoo

Gachon University, Seongnam, Republic of Korea

"Nanomaterials Meet Security: Embracing Emerging Materials in Physically Unclonable Functions"

In 1984, Gustavus Simmons introduced the groundbreaking concept of harnessing the variability in physical properties for authentication, laying the foundation for the development of physically unclonable functions (PUFs).

PUFs produce device-specific cryptographic keys, preventing replication, by harnessing natural physical variations during manufacturing. This uniqueness is prized in high-security applications like encryption, where PUFs generate random, device-specific outputs. Although silicon-based PUFs have achieved notable success, their intricate and costly manufacturing processes involve superfluous steps for exploiting physical property variations.

Consequently, emerging non-silicon nanomaterials are gaining prominence as a more efficient alternative. By utilizing randomness and variation in these nanostructures into physical properties, PUFs can be fabricated through streamlined processes, presenting a desirable device for enhancing security while lowering complexity and cost.

This review article offers an extensive examination of endeavors and strategies concerning nanomaterials-based PUFs and their applications in security. It delves into four primary domains: (1) blending and mixing different materials, (2) self-generated variations in nanomaterials, (3) variations induced by light in nanomaterials, and (4) random value generation utilizing nanomaterials.

BIOLOGICAL & BIOINSPIRED SMART MATERIALS

Gianluca Farinola
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Gianluca Farinola

University of Bari - Italy

Dr. Farinola’s abstract will be published soon.

PRINTED BIOSENSORS & WEARABLES FOR HEALTHCARE APPLICATIONS

Wei Gao
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Wei Gao

California Institute of Technology - Pasadena (CA)

Dr. Gao’s abstract will be published soon.

Francesco Greco
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Francesco Greco

The BioRobotics Institute - Italy

Dr. Greco’s abstract will be published soon.

Luisa Torsi
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Luisa Torsi

University of Bari - Italy

"Point-Of-Care Ultra-Portable Single-Molecule Bioassays for One-Health"

Screening asymptomatic organisms (humans, animals, plants) with a high-diagnostic accuracy using point-of-care-testing (POCT) technologies, though still visionary holds great potential. Convenient surveillance requires easy-to-use, cost-effective, ultra-portable but highly reliable, in-vitro-diagnostic devices that are ready for use wherever they are needed.

Currently, there are not yet such devices available on the market, but there are a couple more promising technologies developed at readiness-level 5: the Clustered-Regularly-Interspaced-Short-Palindromic-Repeats (CRISPR) lateral-flow-strip tests and the Single-Molecule-with-a-large-Transistor (SiMoT) bioelectronic palmar devices. They both hold key features delineated by the World-Health-Organization for POCT systems and an occurrence of false-positive and false-negative errors <1-5% resulting in diagnostic-selectivity and sensitivity >95-99%, while limit-of-detections are of few markers. CRISPR-strip is a molecular assay that, can detect down to few copies of DNA/RNA markers in blood while SiMoT immunometric and molecular test can detect down to a single oligonucleotide, protein marker, or pathogens in 0.1mL of blood, saliva, and olive-sap. These technologies can prospectively enable the systematic and reliable surveillance of asymptomatic ones prior to worsening/proliferation of illnesses allowing for timely diagnosis and swift prognosis. This could establish a proactive healthcare ecosystem that results in effective treatments for all living organisms generating diffuse and well-being at efficient costs.

SOFT ROBOTICS MEETS SOFT ELECTRONICS

Robert Shepherd
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Robert Shepherd

Cornell University - New York (USA)

Dr. Shepherd’s abstract will be published soon.

Majid Taghavi
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Majid Taghavi

Imperial College London - UK

Dr. Taghavi’s abstract will be published soon.

MATERIALS & MANUFACTURING

Harish Subbaraman
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Harish Subbaraman

Oregon State University, USA

Dr. Subbaraman’s abstract will be published soon.

João Coelho
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João Coelho

Universidad de Sevilla - CSIC, Spain

"Graphene Exfoliation on Cyrene for the Green Fabrication of MicroSupercapacitors"

Since its isolation in 2004, graphene has been touted as a wonder material for several applications, notably flexible energy storage. However, the use of hazardous chemicals in graphene production has severely hampered its widespread use in electronics and other applications. Attempts have been made to exfoliate graphene in water or other less harmful solvents. However, these procedures require the use of surfactants and/or long processing times.

In this work, the authors demonstrate a process for exfoliating graphene in cyrene, an environmentally friendly solvent. The resulting inks were then used to fabricate microsupercapacitors (MSCs) on Kapton using a low-cost spray coating approach. The devices exhibited capacitances of up to 1.28 mF cm-2 (0.03 mA cm-2) and energy densities of 0.3 mWh cm-2 (42.04 Wh cm-2). In addition, the MSCs exhibited remarkable cycling stability, retaining 85% of their capacitance after 10,000 cycles (1 mA cm-2).  In conclusion, we present an accessible, rapid, scalable, and sustainable fabrication method for the development of graphene-based devices.

HARVESTING & STORAGE DEVICES

Claudio Gerbaldi
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Claudio Gerbaldi

Politecnico di Torino, Italy

"An Overview on Polymer-based Electrolytes with High Ionic Mobility for Safe Operation of Solid-State Batteries"

Commercial alkali metal ion secondary batteries use as ion transport media liquid electrolytes, which are based on toxic and volatile organic carbonate solvents, and the tendency to undergo side reactions, oxidative decomposition, gas production, and combustion is exacerbated at high temperatures. The most striking solution at present is to switch on all solid-state designs exploiting polymer materials, films, ceramics, low-volatile, green additives, etc. The transformation from liquid- to solid-state architecture is expected to improve safety, fabrication, and temperature stability of energy storage devices, particularly if constraints of low ionic conductivity, low cation transport properties and stringent processing conditions are overcome.

Here, an overview is offered of the recent developments in our laboratories on innovative polymer-based electrolytes allowing high ionic mobility, particularly attractive for safe, high-performing, solid-state alkali metal (chiefly, Li and Na) ion batteries, and obtained by different techniques, including solvent-free UV-induced photopolymerization. Electrochemical performances in lab-scale devices can be readily improved using different kind of RTILs, other specific low-volatile additives and biosourced components. Cyclic voltammetry and galvanostatic charge/discharge cycling coupled with electrochemical impedance spectroscopy exploiting different electrode materials (e.g., LFP, Li-rich NMC, LNMO, hard carbon) demonstrate specific capacities approaching theoretical values even at high C-rates and stable operation for hundreds of cycles at ambient temperature. Direct polymerization procedures on top of the electrode films are also used to obtain an intimate electrode/electrolyte interface, flexible designs and full active material utilization in both half and full cell architectures. In addition, results of composite hybrid polymer electrolytes, as well as new single-ion conducting polymers are shown, which are specifically developed to attain improved ion transport and high oxidation stability for safe operation with high voltage electrodes even at ambient conditions, and are recognized ideal energy storage devices in smart/wearable electronics due to their instinctive safety and high energy density.

IMAGING & LIGHTING DEVICES

Gerardo Hernandez-Sosa
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Gerardo Hernandez-Sosa

Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) - Germany

"Digital Printing of Functional Organic Photodetectors and Multidevice Systems"

Optical detectors are of paramount importance in modern technology as they are crucial sensing elements in fields like communications, imaging, medicine, and consumer electronics. Currently, there is a rapidly increasing research interest in developing photodetectors based on printable materials that can complement traditional technologies. On the one hand, fabrication by printing technology would allow for the potential cost-efficient fabrication of integrated systems. On the other hand, it will enable additional functionalities such as mechanical flexibility and lightweight when combined with flexible substrates. For this to become a reality, printing approaches should encompass a streamlined process that enables high device performance and industrial compatibility while also exploiting the unique properties of functional materials. Furthermore, it should provide the customization and versatility needed for future mobile, wearable, or IoT technologies.

Here, I will discuss the utilization of digital printing techniques for the fabrication of fully organic photodiodes (OPDs) exhibiting state-of-the-art responsivities and detection speeds in the MHz range, as well as the use of the ink formulation as a way to access and tailor material optoelectronic properties. First, I will discuss our efforts in the fabrication of polarization and color-selective printed OPDs. I will show how the addition of a templating agent into the ink formulation results in the self-assembly of aligned polymeric films with anisotropic optical properties. This effect is exploited to fabricate polarization-sensitive photodiodes. Furthermore, I will show our recent efforts in the fabrication of color-selective OPDs based on non-fullerene acceptors and their potential application in visible light communication. Finally, I will demonstrate the integration of inkjet-printed OPDs within monolithically printed active matrix arrays comprising of organic thin film transistors onto an ultra-thin plastic substrate. These arrays demonstrate the high-potential of digital manufacturing for fully printed integrated systems.

Stefano Toffanin
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Stefano Toffanin

CNR Bologna - Italy

Dr. Toffanin’s abstract will be published soon.

SIMULATION & MODELLING

Thomas Gneiting
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Thomas Gneiting

Brunel University - UK

Dr. Gneiting’s abstract will be published soon.

TRANSISTORS & CIRCUITS

Daniel Neumaier
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Daniel Neumaier

Wuppertal University - Germany

Dr. Neumaier’s abstract will be published soon.

EMERGING APPLICATIONS & PRODUCTS

Valerio F. Annese
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Valerio F. Annese

Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia (IIT) - Italy

"Towards Edible Technology for Gastrointestinal Tract Monitoring at the Point-of-Care"

Since the first device was conceived in 1957, ingestible technologies – miniaturised swallowable devices that can navigate the gastrointestinal tract and gather diagnostic data – experienced an evergrowing trend and are now commercially available with an estimated market of USD 819.0 million (2022) as the demand for non-invasive diagnostics increases. Although ingestible technologies greatly improve on traditional invasive methods, they do not eliminate the hospitalisation burden as they cannot be deployed at the point-of-care (POC) due to the associated retention risks of current implementations. In particular, ingestible technologies typically employ non-degradable, rigid, and potentially toxic materials (e.g. heavy metals and traditional batteries) albeit encapsulated. Besides, the non-degradability nature of these single-use systems opens sustainability concerns about e-waste accumulation.

Edible electronics is an emerging research area leveraging the electronic properties of food-derived materials to deliver safe-to-eat technology. The inherent safety and degradability of these materials are particularly advantageous for GI tract monitoring applications. By controlling the degradation rate of the components, edible systems can be completely metabolised by the body after performing a specific task, leaving no electronic waste, eliminating associated health risks and thus potentially removing the need for hospitalisation. Such edible systems would enable POC testing of the GI tract. However, although many edible devices have already been documented, extensive efforts are needed to deliver a POC system in an edible format.

This work presents the latest advances in the development of edible POC systems for GI tract monitoring, by analysing the main constituting elements of a POC system – namely the transducer, the microfluidics, and the bioreceptors. For instance – regarding the transducer – a conductive ink formulated consisting of activated carbon (conductor), Haribo® gummy bears (binder), and a water-ethanol mixture (dispersant) was developed. The ink, deposited on multiple substrates by spray deposition, produces edible electrically conductive composite coatings with a resistivity of ~50 Ω·cm. The ink might find applications in future edible electronic circuits and for producing restive edible sensors. For microfluidics, we produced and assessed candidate materials for passive edible fluidics through a complementary simulation and experimental approach. As a proof-of-concept, we produced simple capillary microstructures compatible with standard replica moulding techniques using a shortlisted set of promising candidates, namely PVA/gelatin hydrogel, and PVA-modified EC. Finally, for the functionalisation, we analysed the use of food enzymes to replicate standard enzymatic assays with edible materials to quantify analytes in the GI fluid.

The future integration of these components among others will pave the way to an unprecedented edible POC system offering unique advantages for testing gastric fluid and delivering non-invasive, safe, rapid, and affordable diagnostics.

Lee Sunghoon
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Lee Sunghoon

University of Tokyo - Japan

Dr. Sunghoon’s abstract will be published soon.

Irene Taurino
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Irene Taurino

Katholieke Universiteit Leuven - Belgium

"Breakthrough Clean Room Compatible Electrode Engineering for Fully-Bioresorbable Electrochemical Tissue Health Monitors"

While bioresorbable electrochemical sensors offer unprecedented potential for continuous in-situ monitoring of critical biomarkers, achieving both stable operational lifetimes and functionality poses a significant challenge. Working towards the goal of devising bioresorbable implantable electrochemical sensors with true clinical applicability, the first critical step is to define the thin film electrodes’ microfabrication and to guarantee a stable and predictable electrochemical performance as a function of ongoing biodissolution. Given the need for the electrode’s direct exposure to the harsh electrolytic environments containing the target analytes, however, attaining operational stability in solution is far from straightforward.

Our research group addresses these challenges by introducing novel fully bioresorbable electrode architectures. We exploited nanostructured reactively sputtered Mo-oxide or W-oxide thin film electrodes. Although Mo, W, and their oxides, are well known for their resorbability and gradual dissolution in biofluids, they remain largely unexplored in the context of bioresorbable implantable electrochemical sensors, especially as sensing sites. As such, there is still much to uncover regarding the potential of these biometals in achieving more robust and longer-lasting implantable electrochemical sensors, crucial for continuous monitoring in clinical settings.

Specifically, we have shown that both bilayer Mo plus MoOx electrodes and W plus WOx electrodes, subjected to tailored post-deposition annealing, exhibit remarkable stability over a period of several days in solution, and predictable electrochemical behavior then probed as a pH and dissolved oxygen sensors, in physiologically mimicking conditions. We have devised a clean room compatible process-flow which allows for the easy integration of these electrodes in fully bioresorbable sensors. Future research aims to re-evaluate the thin film electrode’s performance under various physiological environments and explore strategies for further delaying and controlling film dissolution.

SUSTAINABILITY & ENERGY EFFICIENCY

Mario Caironi
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Mario Caironi

Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia (IIT), Italy

"Edible Electronic Components for Future Edible Electronic Systems"

Edible electronics envisions a technology that is safe for ingestion, environmentally friendly and cost-effective. Differently from “ingestible” electronics, it aims at realizing electronic devices that are degraded within the body after performing their function, either digested or even metabolized, thus removing any retention hazard.

Edible electronics could potentially target a significant number of biomedical applications, such as remote healthcare monitoring, and of applications for food quality monitoring as well, such as edible electronic tags directly in contact with food. It also offers an opportunity for a high level of sustainability for distributed sensors networks in the framework of environmental monitoring and agritech.

Here I report on our recent progress in the development of edible electrolyte-gated transistors based on edible and potentially edible organic semiconductors. Starting from such devices, I will also show the realization of the first edible circuits, and how these can be powered by a rechargeable edible battery. Such results provide a proof-of-concept for  future integrated edible electronic systems for smart pills and smart packaging.

Seung-Kyun Kang
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Seung-Kyun Kang

Seoul National University (SNU) - South Korea

"Advancements in Transient Electronics: Biodegradable Interfaces for Sustainable Healthcare Applications"

Historically, durable plastics were coveted for their longevity, but their indestructibility now poses significant environmental challenges, threatening the sustainability of our society. As such, biodegradable materials have gained prominence as a crucial solution. Concurrently, the field of flexible electronics is rapidly evolving, with direct human interfacing devices becoming increasingly significant in the future electronics industry. However, these flexible patch-type electronics could also contribute to environmental pollution due to their complex and ultra-thin layered structures, complicating recycling and reuse efforts.

This presentation introduces research trends in “Transient Electronics,” focusing on biodegradable electronic devices that combine the versatility of organic-inorganic hybrid materials with high performance. We will explore developments from flexible electronic patches to advanced printed electronics and drug delivery technologies, highlighting their potential in healthcare applications.

Additionally, the presentation will delve into the mechanisms of biodegradability, processing methods for integrating organic and inorganic materials, and key technologies for smart patches, including electrochromism and drug delivery.

FLEXIBLE & PRINTABLE SOLUTIONS IN RFIDS

Diego Masotti
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Diego Masotti

University of Bologna, Italy

"2.45 GHz Silicone-based rectenna: manufacturing techniques and design"

Flexible antennas are raising increasing interests especially when implemented to provide energy to sensors in wearable contexts. The exploitation of polymer-based substrates such as silicones, have paved the way to innovative solutions that are a promising tradeoff between performance and ease of customization. To enable this, fabrication techniques that combine inkjet printing with Polydimethylsiloxane polymer (PDMS) casting have provided a more agile realization of such devices.

Because of their tensile strength and ease of production, polymerbased conductive materials, including conductive nanoparticles of copper, silver, and gold, are becoming widely spread and more and more popular. These materials and the agile linked fabrication processes have been highly exploited to design light, flexible wearable antennas. This work proposes the design process of a rectenna system realized on a specific PDMS and operating at 2.45 GHz to be used in wearable wireless power transfer (WPT) applications. A two-component PDMS compound, SILPURAN6000/05 A/B, has been exploited to create a flexible substrate, whose geometry can be easily customized with specific thickness to favor the rectenna performance: in particular, the substrate exploits two different thicknesses, one suitable for the radiative part and equal to 1.8 mm and the other equal to 0.5 mm, to host the linear and nonlinear part of the rectifier, guaranteeing better guided performance and a more compact matching network.

An experimental campaign has allowed the electromagnetic characterization of the polymer and subsequently the linear and nonlinear subnetwork of the rectenna system have been optimized by means of EM/nonlinear co-simulation. The prototype of the radiating element has been realized and experimentally validated showing promising performance, leading this system to be a remarkably attractive solution for flexible and wearable Radio Frequency frontends.

SPECIAL SESSIONS

Biological and bioinspired smart materials

Living systems are a rich source of inspiration to scientists and engineers who aim to design functional smart materials that can be used in hybrid architectures that incorporate both biological and artificial components. This focus session will cover emerging materials used in abiotic-biotic hybrid systems, as well as their applications for biomedical technologies, bioelectronics and energy storage.

Bridging the world of biology together with other technological areas such as electronics and nanotechnology, this interdisciplinary focus session will bring together the cutting-edge chemical, physical, and biomedical aspects of current and future biohybrid and soft functional interfaces and stimulate discussions on the impact and challenges of biological and bio-inspired polymers.

SESSION CHAIRS

Rossella Labarile
National Research Council (CNR), Italy

Serpil Tekoglu
University Linz (JKU), Austria

Memristor Technology: Theory, Design & Applications

This session is specifically dedicated to exploring the multifaceted aspects of memristor theory, models, applications, and technologies, highlighting their pivotal role in shaping the future of the circuit theory in the broader context of the electrical and electronic engineering. Theorized and presented to the scientific community by L. Chua in 1971, the memristor represents a revolutionary breakthrough in the modern circuit theory enabling a wide range of novel technologies and applications. From high-speed, energy-efficient ReRAM memories to innovative memristor-based biomedical systems, and from novel high-frequency memristor-based circuit models to the dynamic landscape of flexible electronics with memristive materials, the potential applications are boundless.

The special session on Memristors at IEEE IFECT 2024 serves as an unparalleled platform for fostering collaboration, exchanging ideas, and catalyzing innovation within this selected scientific community.

SESSION CHAIRS

Alon Ascoli
Polytechnic of Turin, Italy

Riccardo Colella
National Research Council (CNR), Italy

Fernando Corinto
Polytechnic of Turin, Italy

Giuseppe Grassi
University of Salento, Italy

Printed Biosensors & Wearables for Healthcare Applications

Emerging additive manufacturing technologies (such as printing techniques) are revolutionizing the landscape of electronic devices. Indeed, printed electronics enables the fabrication of small- and medium-volume batches of electronic components for specialized custom applications.

In this context, printed biosensors and wearable devices for healthcare applications are emerging as critical components in the development of innovative diagnostic and  monitoring tools. With their unique capabilities in low-cost, large-scale fabrication and flexibility, they offer unprecedented opportunities for continuous health monitoring and personalized healthcare solutions.

This special session aims to explore the latest research and developments in printed biosensors and wearables tailored for healthcare applications.

SESSION CHAIRS

Adrica Kyndiah
Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia (IIT), Italy

Fabrizio Viola
University of Cagliari, Italy

Soft Robotics Meets Soft Electronics

Soft robotics is an emerging field focusing on the development of robots made from highly  compliant and flexible materials, allowing for safer interactions with humans and delicate environments. In recent years, there has been an exponential increase in research dedicated to soft robotics, driven by a quest for more adaptable, versatile, and biocompatible robotic systems.

Soft electronic technologies play a pivotal role in advancing the capabilities of soft robotics. These technologies involve seamless integrating electronic components onto flexible, non-planar surfaces, enabling enhanced functionalities and control mechanisms for soft robots. In the context of soft robotics, soft electronics has become a crucial technology, driven by its superior compliance, seamless integration capability, and the unique properties of recently exploited materials such as soft conducting polymers, hydrogels, liquid metals, and electrolytic liquids. These materials pave the way for the development of advanced soft sensors, actuators, and integrated soft robotics devices, pushing the boundaries of what is achievable in this exciting field.

This Special Session aims to showcase the latest breakthroughs in soft robotics and soft electronics technologies through interactive sessions, featuring contributions from leading experts. Emphasis will be placed on the theme of sustainability, exploring concepts like transient, biodegradable, and even edible robotics and soft electronics. Join us in discovering advancements that can shape the next generation of soft robotics.

SESSION CHAIRS

Barbara Mazzolai
Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia (IIT), Italy

Virgilio Mattioli
Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia (IIT), Italy

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