PROGRAM

IEEE IFETC 2024 technical program will be published soon. Please note that the schedule may change, so be sure to reference this page for the latest version of the program.

In the meanwhile, meet the Keynote Speakers and the Plenary Speakers of IEEE IFETC 2024, and take the time to browse through its Special Sessions.

KEYNOTE SPEAKERS

Ana Claudia Arias
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Ana Claudia Arias

University of California, Berkeley

"Flexible and Integrated Power Sources for Portable Devices"

Printed batteries, along with photovoltaic power systems comprising solar modules, energy storage, and power management electronics, are pivotal for diverse applications ranging from off-grid and portable power to ambient light harvesting for sensor nodes. The co-design and integration of these components using printing and coating methods on flexible substrates enable the creation of efficient and customizable systems.

Photovoltaic module and energy storage technologies suitable for integration into flexible power systems are considered. The design of electrical characteristics needed for efficiently powering desired loads and strategies for physically integrating these components will be discussed. Our analysis encompasses both hybrid and fully flexible photovoltaic systems, emphasizing the critical role of application-specific requirements in determining the materials and architectures of the system components.

Thuc-Quyen Nguyen
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Thuc-Quyen Nguyen

University of California, Santa Barbara (UCSB)

"Organic Photodetectors: Material Design, Device Engineering, and Applications"

Wide-range light detection from the visible to the near-infrared (NIR) region is central to many applications such as high-speed digital cameras, autonomous vehicles, and wearable electronics.

Organic photodetectors (OPDs) were shown to be a promising platform for these applications. However, the conventional OPDs are often limited by low responsivity, narrow absorption range, high dark current under applied bias, and large-scale production of these devices require halogenated processing solvents that have negative environmental impacts.

In this talk, I will discuss the molecular design rule especially for green solvent processing and strategies to reduce dark current, enhance external quantum efficiency (EQE), and broaden the photodetection range in near IR organic photodetectors based on a bulk heterojunction comprised of a polymer donor and a non-fullerene acceptor. Using resonant optical microcavity, we can extend the wavelength detection range of OPD to a longer wavelength, achieving EQE > 50 % over a broad spectrum 450–1100 nm with a peak specific detectivity (D*) of 1.1´1013 Jones at l = 1100 nm. By employing a new acceptor IR6, EQE = 35 % and D* = 4.1´1012 Jones are obtained at l = 1150 nm. We also demonstrate the use of OPDs in wearable self-powered devices to monitor heart rate and blood oxygen saturation.

Alberto Salleo
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Alberto Salleo

Stanford University

Prof. Salleo’s abstract will be published soon.

PLENARY SPEAKERS

Joachim Burghartz
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Joachim Burghartz

IMS Chips, Germany

"Hybrid Systems-in-Foil – Merging Complementary Technologies"

Large-area flexible electronics has strongly been driven by the paper printing industry, looking for new business opportunities. The advent of organic and metal-oxide semiconductor materials has enabled concepts of printed electronics, aiming at low-cost, large-area, and multifunctional flexible electronic systems in contrast to compact, high-performance, and highly-integrated chip products.

However, more and more applications would be benefitting from combining the advantages of these complementary technology. Hybrid Systems-in-Foil (HySiF) allow for merging the best of those two worlds through assembly of  ultrathin chips large-area printed components jointly on a flexible substrate.

This article addresses the concept with advantages and challenges of HySiFs in terms of their electronic and mechanical aspects. Also addressed are three generic application cases along with manufacturing aspects.

Oana D. Jurchescu
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Oana D. Jurchescu

Wake Forest University in Winston-Salem, North Carolina (USA)

"Shaping the Future of Flexible Optoelectronics and Bioelectronics with Organic Transistors"

Our lives are increasingly intertwined with electronics, from smartphones and smart cars to medical devices and power grids. The Internet of Things (IoT) promises an even more connected future, but it requires new technologies that are flexible, adaptable, and cost-effective. Organic thin-film transistors (OTFTs) are prime candidates for such applications, but unfortunately have not yet reached the performance levels needed for incorporation in real-world devices. Despite significant progress, optimizing charge transport and device stability remains a challenge.

This presentation will focus on the design, processing and device physics in OTFTs, highlighting the current limitations in optimizing charge injection and transport. I will also discuss their environmental and operational stability and highlight the major factors that lead to degradation. Next, I will introduce laser printing, a rapid and scalable manufacturing technique for optoelectronic devices. This method is low-cost, compatible with flexible substrates and environmentally friendly since it is solvent-free, thus eliminating the need of hazardous solvents typically used for printed electronics.

Finally, I will showcase a powerful example of using OTFTs in healthcare. Radiation dosimeters made from large arrays of OTFTs conform to the body and act as flexible, skin-conformal dosimeters. These devices offer high-resolution, real-time dose mapping directly on the patient’s skin, overcoming limitations of current methods.

Max Christian Lemme
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Max Christian Lemme

RWTH Aachen University, Germany

Dr. Lemme’s abstract will be published soon.

Catherine Ramsdale
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Catherine Ramsdale

Pragmatic Semiconductor, UK

Dr. Ramsdale’s abstract will be published soon.

TUTORIAL SPEAKERS

Pietro Cataldi
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Pietro Cataldi

Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia (IIT), Italy

"Materials for Green Electronics: Challenges, Opportunities, and Applications in Robotics and Green Electronics"

Commercially available materials for electronics offer excellent performance at affordable prices. However, these materials primarily consist of long-lasting, petroleum-derived components. Furthermore, their development has been within the framework of a linear economy (produce-use-waste), neglecting considerations of biodegradability, circularity, and end-of-life management. The sustainability of these materials is compromised by issues such as scarcity, human and environmental toxicity, and challenges in recycling. Therefore, it is crucial to prioritize developing materials for electronics that are biobased, biodegradable, and environmentally friendly.

In this tutorial, we will summarize the available sustainable alternatives to traditionally employed materials for electronics. We will briefly survey the employment of biopolymers and proteins as biodegradable, flexible, and lightweight insulators and the unconventional strategies developed to produce environmentally friendly semiconductors. The tutorial’s core will be on green printed circuit board alternatives to flame retardant four (FR4) and electrical conductors, particularly electrically conductive composites. We will summarize the use of green approaches to fabricate electronic materials that can degrade partially or fully in the environment. We will discuss strategies to make compostable FR43 and degradable electronic conductors. Finally, possible applications that will thrive by exploiting environmentally friendly materials for electronics, e.g., in the context of edible electronics or robotics, will be considered.

Guoxiang (Emma) Hu
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Guoxiang (Emma) Hu

Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta (USA)

"Introduction to Computational Approaches for Semiconductors"

Computational studies, complementing experimental observations, can provide deep physicochemical insights into structure-processing-property relationships, and offer new opportunities for semiconductor design and discovery.

In this tutorial, I will introduce basic concepts of ab initio quantum chemistry methods, and demonstrate applications of these methods to semiconducting polymers, perovskites, and transition metal dichalcogenides. I will begin with the widely used density functional theory (DFT) method, which has a good balance between accuracy and computational cost. Then, I will highlight the limitations of DFT, particularly for strongly correlated semiconductors, and discuss how many-body quantum chemistry methods (e.g., quantum Monte Carlo) can be applied to overcome those limitations.

Finally, some data-driven and machine-learning-assisted computational approaches will be covered, which is essential for the design and discovery of highly tunable semiconducting materials. Besides learning computational techniques, the audience will also be encouraged to perform basic calculations during the tutorial, which can be incorporated into their experimental research.

Esma Ismailova
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Esma Ismailova

École Nationale Supérieure Des Mines De Saint Étienne, France

"Seamless organic bioelectronic interfaces: from the fabrication to the health monitoring"

In the 21st century, consumers are rapidly gaining access to a novel suite of wearable electronic devices such as smart watches, glasses and garments. These technologies promise both comfort and ease of use, as well as an access to a wealth of health-related information.

Advances in the field of electronic textiles, and recent achievements in organic electronics, have enabled the development of new flexible and conformable technologies that can perform the same sensing as current solid-state devices, for a fraction of the cost. Such progress relies on the subtle engineering of organic materials to model their properties in functional devices. The sustainable potential of using organic ionic and electronic conducting materials in wearable monitoring systems has yet to be demonstrated. In cutaneous applications, the use of such organic materials as electrodes lowers contact impedance with the skin resulting in higher quality recordings compared to metal-based electrodes. Combining these materials with textile structures and thin films reduces the mechanical mismatch at the interface with the skin, which enables the recording of electrophysiological activities for long time intervals with an enhanced signal to noise ratio. Traditional and non-traditional direct patterning techniques allow the selective deposition of organic materials onto different kind of fabrics.

Therefore, the integration of organic electronics and the textile platform provides low-cost and tailored solutions in interfacing smart devices with the human body.

Hocheon Yoo
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Hocheon Yoo

Gachon University, Seongnam, Republic of Korea

"Nanomaterials Meet Security: Embracing Emerging Materials in Physically Unclonable Functions"

In 1984, Gustavus Simmons introduced the groundbreaking concept of harnessing the variability in physical properties for authentication, laying the foundation for the development of physically unclonable functions (PUFs).

PUFs produce device-specific cryptographic keys, preventing replication, by harnessing natural physical variations during manufacturing. This uniqueness is prized in high-security applications like encryption, where PUFs generate random, device-specific outputs. Although silicon-based PUFs have achieved notable success, their intricate and costly manufacturing processes involve superfluous steps for exploiting physical property variations.

Consequently, emerging non-silicon nanomaterials are gaining prominence as a more efficient alternative. By utilizing randomness and variation in these nanostructures into physical properties, PUFs can be fabricated through streamlined processes, presenting a desirable device for enhancing security while lowering complexity and cost.

This review article offers an extensive examination of endeavors and strategies concerning nanomaterials-based PUFs and their applications in security. It delves into four primary domains: (1) blending and mixing different materials, (2) self-generated variations in nanomaterials, (3) variations induced by light in nanomaterials, and (4) random value generation utilizing nanomaterials.

SPECIAL SESSIONS

"Biological and bioinspired smart materials"

Living systems are a rich source of inspiration to scientists and engineers who aim to design functional smart materials that can be used in hybrid architectures that incorporate both biological and artificial components. This focus session will cover emerging materials used in abiotic-biotic hybrid systems, as well as their applications for biomedical technologies, bioelectronics and energy storage.

Bridging the world of biology together with other technological areas such as electronics and nanotechnology, this interdisciplinary focus session will bring together the cutting-edge chemical, physical, and biomedical aspects of current and future biohybrid and soft functional interfaces and stimulate discussions on the impact and challenges of biological and bio-inspired polymers.

SESSION CHAIRS

Rossella Labarile
National Research Council (CNR), Italy

Serpil Tekoglu
University Linz (JKU), Austria

"Memristor Technology: Theory, Design
and Applications"

This session is specifically dedicated to exploring the multifaceted aspects of memristor theory, models, applications, and technologies, highlighting their pivotal role in shaping the future of the circuit theory in the broader context of the electrical and electronic engineering. Theorized and presented to the scientific community by L. Chua in 1971, the memristor represents a revolutionary breakthrough in the modern circuit theory enabling a wide range of novel technologies and applications. From high-speed, energy-efficient ReRAM memories to innovative memristor-based biomedical systems, and from novel high-frequency memristor-based circuit models to the dynamic landscape of flexible electronics with memristive materials, the potential applications are boundless.

The special session on Memristors at IEEE IFECT 2024 serves as an unparalleled platform for fostering collaboration, exchanging ideas, and catalyzing innovation within this selected scientific community.

SESSION CHAIRS

Riccardo Colella
National Research Council (CNR), Italy

Ferdinando Corinto
Polytechnic of Turin, Italy

Giuseppe Grassi
University of Salento, Italy

"Printed Biosensors and Wearables for
Healthcare Applications"

Emerging additive manufacturing technologies (such as printing techniques) are revolutionizing the landscape of electronic devices. Indeed, printed electronics enables the fabrication of small- and medium-volume batches of electronic components for specialized custom applications.

In this context, printed biosensors and wearable devices for healthcare applications are emerging as critical components in the development of innovative diagnostic and  monitoring tools. With their unique capabilities in low-cost, large-scale fabrication and flexibility, they offer unprecedented opportunities for continuous health monitoring and personalized healthcare solutions.

This special session aims to explore the latest research and developments in printed biosensors and wearables tailored for healthcare applications.

SESSION CHAIRS

Adrica Kyndiah
Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia (IIT), Italy

Fabrizio Viola
University of Cagliari, Italy

"Soft Robotics Meets Soft Electronics"

Soft robotics is an emerging field focusing on the development of robots made from highly  compliant and flexible materials, allowing for safer interactions with humans and delicate environments. In recent years, there has been an exponential increase in research dedicated to soft robotics, driven by a quest for more adaptable, versatile, and biocompatible robotic systems.

Soft electronic technologies play a pivotal role in advancing the capabilities of soft robotics. These technologies involve seamless integrating electronic components onto flexible, non-planar surfaces, enabling enhanced functionalities and control mechanisms for soft robots. In the context of soft robotics, soft electronics has become a crucial technology, driven by its superior compliance, seamless integration capability, and the unique properties of recently exploited materials such as soft conducting polymers, hydrogels, liquid metals, and electrolytic liquids. These materials pave the way for the development of advanced soft sensors, actuators, and integrated soft robotics devices, pushing the boundaries of what is achievable in this exciting field.

This Special Session aims to showcase the latest breakthroughs in soft robotics and soft electronics technologies through interactive sessions, featuring contributions from leading experts. Emphasis will be placed on the theme of sustainability, exploring concepts like transient, biodegradable, and even edible robotics and soft electronics. Join us in discovering advancements that can shape the next generation of soft robotics.

SESSION CHAIRS

Virgilio Mattioli
Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia (IIT), Italy

Barbara Mazzolai
Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia (IIT), Italy

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